Articles by Colonel Kenneth Allard (US Army, Ret.)

Life, Death & Courage: Some Lessons From the Heart of Texas

Last Sunday afternoon, I was looking forward to writing my usual FSM column about Veterans Day. There were lots of urgent national security questions to think about as well as more troubling bedrock issues. Like when the reigning Pharisees at Christ Church Alexandria (VA) recently removed plaques honoring two former members who were also distinguished veterans: Robert E. Lee and George Washington. Or when standing for the National Anthem at NFL games suddenly became controversial. If we disrespect those touchstones of history, when less than one percent of Americans are willing to serve in uniform, do we even deserve to…


We Told You So!

This commentary is being republished with the recent news concerning FBI Director James Comey. Col. Allard wrote, “I published this column ten months ago and now feel vindicated for having said even then that Comey was a disgrace to the office.”   Ed. My July Fourth optimism about America’s future lasted less than twelve hours, from colorful fireworks splashed across a South Texas sky to Tuesday morning’s whitewash of Hillary Clinton. But maybe that’s just me because, for the best part of a 25-year military career, I was a special agent in the Army equivalent of the FBI. Most of my experience took…


Peacemakers in the Midst of Radical Islamist Terror

On my bookcase sits a small leatherette plaque bearing three words from St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians: “Love Never Fails.” His words fall easily from the lips of average Christians. But what makes this memento so special is the giver: Pope Theodoros II, spiritual leader of Egypt’s Coptic Christian Church. On Palm Sunday, he narrowly escaped assassination by ISIS, when terrorists bombed two Coptic churches and killed 47 worshippers. ISIS claimed credit, boasting that Christians are their favorite prey. Although TV coverage quickly faded, for me this conflict has been intensely personal since September 2013. Not long after 30…


An Evening at the Generation Gap

After the recent student riots at Berkeley and Middlebury, Tuesday evening’s lecture at Trinity University by Dinesh D’Souza was a pleasant throwback to that forgotten era when civility and free speech reigned on college campuses. Security was tight as the crowd of several thousand filled Laurie Auditorium to hear the conservative provocateur, gray hair and Trump t-shirts marking the generational dividing lines between concerned citizens and Trinity students. Greeted by cheers and a standing ovation, D ‘Souza lost little time getting to the red meat his audience craved. He contrasted the organized resistance of the anti-Trump movement   “from the national…


When Political Correctness Stands in for Morality

Pope Francis arrives just in time to bring the plight of the unborn to light by Ken Allard [Republished from the Washington Times, September 21, 2015] This week’s visit by Pope Francis comes just in time. He is an apostolic missionary courageously reaching out to a once-religious country that now ruthlessly kills its unborn, mercilessly harvesting and selling their body parts. It is somehow fitting that our local witch doctors helpfully enshrine political correctness as a convenient substitute for morality. True Religion is mostly a phrase we use while adorning our butts in ever-widening swatches of denim. Otherwise our most…


A Julian Castro defeat in San Antonio

By Ken Allard, Republished from the Washington Times, Monday, June 15, 2015 Because the mainstream media was fawning all over Hillary Clinton’s latest campaign re-set, you might not have seen these weekend headlines. A quietly determined underdog triumphed over an entrenched political machine. A potential vice-presidential candidate in 2016 was abandoned by his political base. And the underdog began her victory speech by shouting “To God Be The Glory!” – a felony anywhere but in Texas. All those things happened on Saturday when Ivy Taylor became the first black woman elected as San Antonio’s mayor. Initially given little chance, she defeated…


Why I’m Voting for Mayor Ivy Taylor

I grew up back east in towns like Boston and Baltimore, where pulpit messages often told parishioners for whom they should vote. But depending on whether the pulpit was Catholic or Protestant, you might receive mixed messages about whether John Kennedy should be elected president. Both sides probably exaggerated JFK’s religious devotion but were closer together only a few years later when defending civil rights as simple and overdue justice. I grew up amidst the divisions that followed. Ever since, I have believed that sermons are inappropriate occasions for instructing anyone about how they should vote – much less for…


The Silence of the Lambs

What is the obligation of the Christian church to speak out against evil – in the nation or our city? The answer one hears, often whispered in carefully modulated tones within cloistered walls, is that these evils, like many other sins, are indeed the proper concern of committed Christians. But they are best dealt with through prayer and meditation rather than through direct action by the church itself. Instead, the argument goes, the business of the church is simply to be the church, a safe place from which to perform charity and good works, a beacon of godliness inspiring our…


Adversity Uniting the Body of Christ

Thank God for the San Antonio Torch! This online magazine is not only the right format but has also arrived at precisely the right moment for the San Antonio faith community. Two years ago, we were sitting in the same pews, often in the very same churches where many of us had worshipped for most of our lives. While we dutifully read Christ’s prayer for unity on the eve of His crucifixion, it seemed as if Catholics and Protestants didn’t really have very much in common.  Of course, we recognized that we were all on the same side, applauding politely…